• WINTER WEATHER / HOLIDAY RESOURCES
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    With Winter Weather Preparedness Week and the holidays right around the corner, I wanted to share some FEMA resources that you may find helpful. Feel free to customize them as you see fit!

     

    Winter Weather Social Media Toolkit: https://www.ready.gov/winter-toolkit

     

    Winter Storm Playbook: https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1423496371216-93e95c701b1f9bc95a2faacfafa03590/AP_PLYBK_WS_final_090414_508b.pdf

     

    When the Sky Turns Gray (animated video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVpGJ_Xl__w&list=UUVrYey5SZMid_VZk9D8tYmA

     

    Holiday safety social media toolkit: https://www.ready.gov/holiday-toolkit

     

    Please let me know if Jones County EMA can assist you in any way.  Have a happy Thanksgiving!

     

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  • FIRE DEPARTMENT PHOTO FUNDRAISER
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    For the Past 36 years Jones County Department of Fire Rescue / EMA has sponsored an Annual Photo Fund Raising Program to help purchase equipment for our Fire Department and EMA. In the next few weeks representatives will be visiting our neighborhoods going from door to door asking to support our Annual Program.  All of the representatives are bonded, licensed, and registered through the Office of Georgia Secretary of State.  The representatives are also required to render an extensive back ground check and submit a personal photo I.D., including make, year, color, and license plate number of each vehicle that the representatives will be driving.  Each representative going from door to door will have to surrender all of the said information to the Jones County Sheriff’s Office prior to entering our neighborhoods.  This fund raiser has been extremely helpful for many years by purchasing rescue tools, extrication equipment, personal protective equipment, training equipment, etc.  For every donation submitted a 10 x 13 family portrait will be given free of charge as a way of saying thank you.  All donations are tax deductible.  On behalf of the Jones County Department of Fire Rescue / EMA, I want to express my sincere appreciation for your past, current, and future support.  Please call the Jones County EMA Office at 478-986-6672 for any information needed.

     

    Proudly Serving You,

    Don Graham

    Jones Co. Fire Chief / EMA Director

     

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  • SEPTEMBER IS NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH
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    September is National Preparedness Month

    (ATLANTA) – September is National Preparedness Month, and Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency is working with Jones County Emergency Management Agency along with other Emergency Management Agencies to ensure citizens across the state are preparing themselves and their families for natural and man-made disasters. Throughout the month, GEMA/HS is encouraging all Georgia residents to prepare before disasters strike. This year’s National Preparedness Month theme is Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How.

    “As we observe National Preparedness Month, it is the perfect opportunity for the citizens of Georgia to create a personal and family plan for potential disasters,” said GEMA/HS Director Homer Bryson.

    Taking steps each week toward developing a plan will increase household and community responsiveness when severe weather and other emergencies occur. The themes each week during National Preparedness month are:

    Week 1: September 1-8 Make and Practice Your Plan

    Week 2: September 9-15 Learn Life Saving Skills

    Week 3: September 16-22 Check Your Insurance Coverage

    Week 4: September 23-30 Save For an Emergency

    On September 15, National Day of Action, residents are encouraged to participate in a preparedness event in their school, business or place of worship. For tips and tools to get your family and community ready for a disaster, visit www.ready.ga.gov. Additional preparedness information is also available from your local EMA director.

    As part of the Office of the Governor, the Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency collaborates with local, state and federal governments in partnership with private sector and non-governmental organizations to protect life and property against man-made and natural emergencies. GEMA/HS’s Ready Georgia website and preparedness campaign provides Georgians with the knowledge needed to effectively prepare for disasters. Go to www.ready.ga.gov for information on developing a custom emergency plan and Ready kit.

    Don Graham, EMA Director

     

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  • Widespread Flu in Georgia
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    If you have not gotten a flu shot yet, do not wait any longer! The predominant strain of flu circulating in Georgia and around the country is influenza A (H3N2). This strain can be particularly hard on the very young, people over age 65, or those with existing medical conditions. Every individual over six months of age should get a flu shot.

    Flu symptoms and their intensity can vary from person to person, and can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. If you think you have the flu, call or visit your doctor.

    There are other things you can do to help prevent the spread of flu – tried and true measures your mother taught you.

    • Frequent and thorough hand-washing with soap and warm water. Alcohol based gels are the next best thing if you don’t have access to soap and water.
    • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing to help prevent the spread of the flu. Use a tissue or cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow or arm.
    • Avoid touching your face as flu germs can get into the body through mucus membranes of the nose, mouth and eyes.
    • If you are sick, stay home from school or work. Flu sufferers should be free of a fever, without the use of a fever reducer, for at least 24 hours before returning to school or work.

    Georgia Department of Public Health

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  • GEORGIA SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK FEB 5-9
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    Beginning next week (Monday, February 5), with support from our state emergency management partners (GEMA), Jones County will recognize Severe Weather Preparedness Week with the state of Georgia.  Each day (through Friday, Feb 9) will address a specific severe weather safety/preparedness topic.  As many of you know, the potential of experiencing severe weather, including tornadoes, across the Southeast region ramps up in February — peaking in April.  This time last year, we were recovering from a significant 2-day severe weather outbreak (Jan 21-22) that affected much of south and central Georgia.

    Take the time to prepare NOW and remind your family, coworkers, and friends about the importance of having a severe weather safety plan!  Additional information can be found on our local SWPW web page.

    NOAA Weather Radio “TEST” exercise — Wednesday, February 7th at 9:00AM.

    In conjunction with our state and local emergency management partners, we will do a special (9am – Wednesday) Routine Test (RT) to simulate a tornado warning for area schools (and businesses) so they may conduct their respective/appropriate action plans in the event severe weather warnings are issued.

    Be Prepared,

    Don Graham, Jones Co. EMA Director

     

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  • HOW TO VIEW THE 2017 SOLAR ECLIPSE SAFELY
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    Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe (link is external)).

    Eclipse glass

    The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” (example shown at left) or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun; they transmit thousands of times too much sunlight. Refer to the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers (link is external) page for a list of manufacturers and authorized dealers of eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers verified to be compliant with the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard for such products.

    • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter.
    • Always supervise children using solar filters.
    • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
    • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.
    • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
    • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the front of any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.
    • USA map with eclipse pathIf you are within the path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe (link is external)), remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases.
    • Outside the path of totality, you must always use a safe solar filter to view the sun directly.
    • If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them.

    Note: If your eclipse glasses or viewers are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish. Furthermore, if the filters aren’t scratched, punctured, or torn, you may reuse them indefinitely. Some glasses/viewers are printed with warnings stating that you shouldn’t look through them for more than 3 minutes at a time and that you should discard them if they are more than 3 years old. Such warnings are outdated and do not apply to eclipse viewers compliant with the ISO 12312-2 standard adopted in 2015. To make sure you get (or got) your eclipse glasses/viewers from a supplier of ISO-compliant products, see the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers (link is external) page.

    An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is pinhole projection (link is external). For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other, creating a waffle pattern. With your back to the sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse. Or just look at the shadow of a leafy tree during the partial eclipse; you’ll see the ground dappled with crescent Suns projected by the tiny spaces between the leaves.

    A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime. More information:

    eclipse.aas.org (link is external)          eclipse2017.nasa.gov
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  • STAY SAFE THIS JULY 4TH
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    STAY SAFE THIS JULY 4TH

    Ensure your Independence Day weekend is filled with celebration and not regret with these 10 fire safety tips, from JONES COUNTY EMA / DEPARTMENT OF FIRE RESCUE

    1. Fireworks in Georgia are legal and should be handled with extreme caution and care at all times.

    2. Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities and never allow children to play with or ignite fireworks. Sparklers alone account for one quarter of emergency room fireworks injuries.

    3. If you set off fireworks, keep a bucket of water handy in case of malfunction or fire.

    4. If fireworks malfunction, don’t relight them! Douse and soak them with water then throw them away.

    5. Never ignite fireworks in a container, especially one that is glass or metal.

    6. Use your grill well away from your home and deck railings, and out from under branches or overhangs.

    7. Open your gas grill before lighting.

    8. Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below your gas or propane grill so it cannot be ignited.

    9. Declare a three-foot “kid and pet-free zone” around the grill to keep them safe.

    10. Avoid loose clothing that can catch fire when cooking on the grill.

    You can find more information and tips on being fire safe this Fourth of July, by visiting www.usfa.fema.gov and be sure to download the FEMA app, available for Apple, Android and Blackberry mobile devices. The app includes home fire safety tips and reminders users can set to test smoke alarms (monthly), change smoke alarm batteries (yearly), and practice fire escape plans (every six months).

    JONES COUNTY EMA supports our citizens and first responders to ensure that our community continues to work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

    Don Graham
    Fire Chief / EMA Director

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  • SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK – FEB 6-10
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    In conjunction with Jones County Emergency Management Agency and state and local partners, next week (February 6-10) will be recognized by the state of Georgia as Severe Weather Preparedness Week.

    In light of the devastating outbreak that affected the southern half of the state on January 21-22, a larger number of Georgians have now witnessed the incredible power/impacts severe weather can bring to this state/region.  Let us use this preparedness week as a reminder to everyone, of just how dangerous severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, and even flash flooding, can be across this state, and the Southeast region.

    Specific topics and days through the week are as follows:

    Monday, February 6: Family Preparedness (including NWR and Wireless Emergency Alerts).

    Tuesday, February 7: Thunderstorm Safety (large hail/damaging wind)

    Wednesday, February 8: Tornado Safety **including statewide Tornado Drill at 9AM EST**

    Thursday, February 9: Lightning Safety.

    Friday, February 10: Flash Flooding/Flood Safety.

    Thank you for all your continued support.
    AUTH:  DRG600

     

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  • REMINDER: CLOCKS FALL BACK THIS WEEKEND
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    smokey2

    This Sunday (November 6, 2016) morning at 2:00 a.m. push your clocks back 1 hour.  Also, remember to change the batteries in your smoke detectors.

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  • GET INVOLVED DURING NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH
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    September is National Preparedness Month, and the JONES COUNTY EMA is advising Jones County to get ready for all man-made and natural disasters.

     

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Ready America campaign,

    National Preparedness Month was founded after 9/11 to increase awareness and encourage action for emergency preparedness nationwide.

     

    “National Preparedness Month is an ideal time for all residents to revisit their emergency preparedness efforts,” said Jones County EMA Director Don Graham. “By knowing about potential local threats, making a plan and building a kit of emergency supplies, residents can ensure the safety of their families in the event of a disaster.”

     

    Throughout the month, the Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency’s Ready Georgia campaign and Jones County EMA will join a nationwide coalition of thousands of private, public and nonprofit organizations, each hosting local events and initiatives designed to motivate people to take the necessary steps to ensure that their homes, workplaces and communities are prepared for disasters and emergencies of all kinds. This year’s theme is Don’t Wait to Communicate: Make an Emergency Plan Today, and each week focuses on preparation for different disasters.

     

     

    • Week 3 (Sept. 11-17): Honor 9/11 by Getting involved in your community and planning with your neighbors.

     

      • Week 4 (Sept. 18-24):  Individual Preparedness
        • Take steps to prepare for a disaster by downloading the Ready GA app.

     

     

    To encourage preparation and get the communities engaged, GEMHSA is coordinating ‘Who’s Ready, Georgia? The Search for Georgia’s Most Prepared Citizen’, which will be promoted on their Twitter and Facebook beginning September 1. Residents of all counties are encouraged to nominate the most prepared person they know, and votes will be counted at the end of the month. The winner will be recognized as Georgia’s Most Prepared, and awarded a signed certificate from state officials, along with other prizes.

     

    For preparedness on the go, download the Ready Georgia mobile app.

     

    About Ready Georgia

    Ready Georgia is a statewide campaign designed to educate and empower Georgians to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, pandemic outbreaks, potential terrorist attacks and other large-scale emergencies.  The campaign is a project of Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency and provides a local dimension to Ready America, a broader national campaign. Ready Georgia aims to prepare citizens for maintaining self-sufficiency for at least 72 hours following an emergency, and uses an interactive website, free mobile app, broadcast and print advertising and public awareness media messaging to reach its audiences. Ready Georgia is also on Facebook and YouTube.

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Contact Us

Jones County, Georgia
P.O. Box 1359
Gray, Georgia 31032-1359
Office: (478) 986-6405
Fax: (478) 986-6462

Community Citizen Enrollment

 

 

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